re: Biggus Dickus may be a joke name. But Longus Cattus is actually Latin.
reddit (comment)
{ posted: Sunday, 19 August, 2018 at 10:51pm // views: 7 // words: 5 }

Wewease Wodewick!

[context: PMcCullough @ reddit]

re: MRW I’m a liberal New Yorker who sees the cost of living in the deep south.
reddit (comment)
{ posted: Tuesday, 7 August, 2018 at 7:32pm // views: 16 // words: 45 }

I'm actually a Southerner with a conservative bent. I had to say "I'm a Liberal New Yorker" because the rules of this sub are that you have to start the title "MRW" so I had to write it in the first person.

[context: PMcCullough @ reddit]

re: MRW I’m a liberal New Yorker who sees the cost of living in the deep south.
reddit (comment)
{ posted: Tuesday, 7 August, 2018 at 3:01pm // views: 14 // words: 28 }

Exactly. And they'll bring along the voting preferences that turned their home states into the sort of place they flee from at no additional cost!

[context: PMcCullough @ reddit]

re: MRW I’m a liberal New Yorker who sees the cost of living in the deep south.
reddit (comment)
{ posted: Tuesday, 7 August, 2018 at 2:05pm // views: 14 // words: 35 }

Supposed to be an implied idea of hating the politics and culture of the place, but going full hog with a Confederate uniform as he sprints toward Dixie's sweet sweet property taxes.

[context: PMcCullough @ reddit]

re: How Benedict Arnold was treated by the British after the war. His duel with an aristocrat and the tragic death of his eldest son whilst fighting FOR the British.
reddit (comment)
{ posted: Tuesday, 7 August, 2018 at 2:05pm // views: 13 // words: 22 }

He didn't pardon Jeff Davis. Jimmy Carter did. So if Davis wasn't pardoned, why was he released from prison?

[context: PMcCullough @ reddit]

MRW I’m a liberal New Yorker who sees the cost of living in the deep south.
reddit
{ posted: Tuesday, 7 August, 2018 at 1:56pm // views: 16 // words: 4 }

[src: PMcCullough @ reddit]

re: How Benedict Arnold was treated by the British after the war. His duel with an aristocrat and the tragic death of his eldest son whilst fighting FOR the British.
reddit (comment)
{ posted: Tuesday, 7 August, 2018 at 11:38am // views: 12 // words: 10 }

I hadn't heard of Poe's Law–quite salient!

[context: PMcCullough @ reddit]

re: How Benedict Arnold was treated by the British after the war. His duel with an aristocrat and the tragic death of his eldest son whilst fighting FOR the British.
reddit (comment)
{ posted: Tuesday, 7 August, 2018 at 11:35am // views: 11 // words: 321 }

I genuinely do appreciate that there are endless sources that can be cited showing that the systemic oppression of abducted human beings and their descendants was at the heart of the Southern Cause. But I can delineate my ancestors' selfless and valiant service to that Cause from the Cause itself, and I think any society that prides itself on free thought and expression and seeks to move forward needs to have the capacity for nuance that permits that.

I think you raise a perfectly valid point in asking how that principle operates if we try and carry it over to Nazis. I guess I'd be curious to hear what the descendants of Nazi soldiers who act as apologists would have to say about it, but from my point of view, they largely sought to distance and disown it on their own, not due to outside influences.

The great sin of the Third Reich was its explicit, thoughtfully orchestrated genocide. The great sin of the Confederate States was human slavery.

Personally, I feel comfortable demeaning the Third Reich with moral honesty, because I do not honor any historical group, cause, or government that engaged in intentional genocide for the sake of genocide. When Americans denigrate the Confederacy, I feel they lack that same moral high ground, because they celebrate other governments (the United States) and individuals (George Washington) who engaged in, profited from, and affirmed human slavery.

Moreover, when the Second World War ended, the victors tried and executed the leadership of the Third Reich. With the exception of a bureaucrat that served as the whipping boy for Andersonville, no Confederate leaders were ever tried for anything. Was this simply an act of supreme charity from the benevolent US Government? Probably to an extent, but moreover, I think they knew that they would have a hard row to hoe in proving the Confederate leadership had committed any legal wrong.

[context: PMcCullough @ reddit]

re: How Benedict Arnold was treated by the British after the war. His duel with an aristocrat and the tragic death of his eldest son whilst fighting FOR the British.
reddit (comment)
{ posted: Tuesday, 7 August, 2018 at 11:15am // views: 16 // words: 49 }

I had hoped the absurdity of trying to link the WWII memorial to 21st Century US-German relations, and the Bicentennial of the Revolutionary War to Vietnamese immigration would help underscore the absurdity of tying Southern Centennial Celebrations to Civil Rights. Sorry it didn't come across clearly.

[context: PMcCullough @ reddit]

re: How Benedict Arnold was treated by the British after the war. His duel with an aristocrat and the tragic death of his eldest son whilst fighting FOR the British.
reddit (comment)
{ posted: Tuesday, 7 August, 2018 at 9:42am // views: 18 // words: 158 }

Point well taken about the monuments going up not in the immediate aftermath of the War when Reconstruction-era Southerners flush with cash and resources should have been erecting them, but at the height of the civil rights movement.

What other possible explanation could there be for a sudden surge of Confederate commemoration in the 1960s except to try and intimidate non-whites. It's almost as baffling as the glut of Revolutionary War memorials and monuments that went up in the late 1970s, no doubt motivated solely by a desire to let the influx of Vietnamese refugees know that they would never be real Americans like those of us who descend from Revolutionary soldiers.

You've also probably noted that the WWII National Memorial wasn't erected until 2004, when it was clearly an aggressive thumbing of our noses at German Chancellor Schröder's refusal to commit German troops to the U.S. and UK led multinational force in Iraq.

[context: PMcCullough @ reddit]

Instagram #BmLeHHLnrKk
instagram
{ posted: Tuesday, 7 August, 2018 at 9:23am // views: 12 // words: 30 }

The Wayne County Fair is one of the things I look forward to the most every year. The most deliriously happy I ever see the boys.

[Photo src: P_G_McCullough @ instagram]

re: How Benedict Arnold was treated by the British after the war. His duel with an aristocrat and the tragic death of his eldest son whilst fighting FOR the British.
reddit (comment)
{ posted: Tuesday, 7 August, 2018 at 8:06am // views: 15 // words: 81 }

I'm always puzzled by people who can make such an easy and absolute distinction between the Colonies' secession from the Crown and the South's secession from the Republic.

History has not been particularly unkind to Loyalists on the whole, just to Arnold for switching sides. The only Confederate who could substantively be compared to him would be Frank Crawford Armstrong, who resigned his commission in the Union Army after leading troops at Bull Run to join the South.

[context: PMcCullough @ reddit]

re: How Benedict Arnold was treated by the British after the war. His duel with an aristocrat and the tragic death of his eldest son whilst fighting FOR the British.
reddit (comment)
{ posted: Tuesday, 7 August, 2018 at 7:56am // views: 13 // words: 31 }

Absolutely. Beyond allegiances or right or wrong, loyalty was highly valued. Particularly well illustrated by how enamored many of the American soldiers of the day were with André.

[context: PMcCullough @ reddit]

re: Words are made out of other words, woah
reddit (comment)
{ posted: Thursday, 2 August, 2018 at 3:26pm // views: 14 // words: 37 }

If you could get "be" and "L" and "ve" together, you just need to find a "dere" and then you'd have Mr. Belvedere, and these lonely folks might just live the good life yet.

[context: PMcCullough @ reddit]

re: None of my IRL friends like history. Any tips on how to meet people I can talk to about history that won’t be annoyed?
reddit (comment)
{ posted: Saturday, 28 July, 2018 at 11:50am // views: 27 // words: 49 }

Someone mentioned historical societies–similarly, if you're eligible, hereditary societies are great (eg. Sons of the Revolution, Sons of Union Veterans, there's dozens of them) because they are made up of history buffs, AND they tend to be very social, with regular meet-ups to help foster friendships.

[context: PMcCullough @ reddit]

Averill & Sammy On Air
personal
{ posted: Tuesday, 24 July, 2018 at 2:32pm // views: 253 // words: 48 }

Leila took the boys down to our local NPR affiliate, WJFF (for which she is a board member) and they were (briefly) on air. Have a listen and consider donating to the station to help end their Pledge Drive!

re: Does anyone know what the responsibilities of a sergeant in the US military would’ve been during the American Civil War and World War I?
reddit (comment)
{ posted: Monday, 23 July, 2018 at 9:20am // views: 33 // words: 120 }

I don't know about WWI, but I was told by a Union reenactor that the role of the Sergeant was to carry the flag. A bit of Googling doesn't seem to support that (nor disprove it) but I happened upon this interesting forum discussion which states that a Union Sergeant was expected to:

Keep and track clothing accounts, camp and garrison equipage, ordnance, consequences for the soldier (anything effecting the soldier). . Entered into company books.

Keeps company roster, takes daily roll, reports to Commander. Entered into company books.

My 4x-great grandfather was a Confederate 1st Sergeant, so now I'm wondering if I can find records of his company written in his hand…

[context: PMcCullough @ reddit]

Instagram #BlQ8ejRnkLi
instagram
{ posted: Sunday, 15 July, 2018 at 3:54pm // views: 34 // words: 209 }

Was so pleased to be able to participate in today’s commemoration of the Shohola Train Wreck which took place only a few miles from my home on this day 154 years ago. A small service took place at the site of the final resting place of 2 North Carolina soldiers that were among the 44 Confederate Prisoners of War killed in the crash.nnAs a past commander of the New York City camp of the Sons of Confederate Veterans, I was very graciously invited to make a few remarks, and I spoke mostly on how apt a metaphor for the War the train crash was. The soldiers did not lay the tracks, did not build the train, did not conceive of the journey, yet it was they who were forced to ride it–who profited the least and paid the most dearly.nnWas especially delighted that Averill and Sammy, whose own Confederate ancestors fill similar graves across the South (and one, Enoch Cape, buried in the train’s intended destination–Elmira Prison Camp in Upstate New York), were afforded the privilege of laying flowers on the graves of the two Confederate soldiers who were cared for by Sullivan County residents following the crash, and who perished a few days later.

[Photo src: P_G_McCullough @ instagram]

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