re: TIL that when Congress voted on a Declaration of War against Japan, the only member of either house to vote against it was Jeannette Rankin, the first woman to hold federal office in the United States.
reddit (comment)
{ posted: Friday, 7 December, 2018 at 11:32am // views: 2 // words: 35 }

I don't agree with the vote, but I admire the consistency and courage. Too many politicians claim to be opposed to war right up until they get their finger on the trigger.

[context: PMcCullough @ reddit]

Did you experience anything meaningful when you visited an ancestral site?
reddit
{ posted: Friday, 7 December, 2018 at 10:28am // views: 6 // words: 4 }

[src: PMcCullough @ reddit]

re: Why didn’t any of Peter O’Toole’s performances ever quite measure up to his turn as Sir Cedric Willingham in King Ralph?
reddit (comment)
{ posted: Thursday, 6 December, 2018 at 3:02pm // views: 6 // words: 126 }

I was sort of thinking the same. The chemistry between them was electric and I imagine O'Toole must have been surprised and delighted to find the underrated Goodman gave him so much. You can really see how they push each other in their scenes together.

It's really well represented at the end, when they have an exchange where each line is moving and gives you goosebumps, only to be countered with another of even greater emotional resonance:

–It's I who should be thanking you. You showed me how to be a king.

–Me? I was a lousy king.

–On the contrary. You are a good and decent man, and you've acted honorably. I shall try to follow your example.

–Thank you, Ced.

[context: PMcCullough @ reddit]

Do you mind snapping a photo of us for the website? [x-post from r/mildlyinteresting]
reddit
{ posted: Thursday, 6 December, 2018 at 10:27am // views: 8 // words: 4 }

[src: PMcCullough @ reddit]

Instagram #BrBCss8Ba2T
instagram
{ posted: Wednesday, 5 December, 2018 at 1:49pm // views: 10 // words: 32 }

For every Southern boy, not once but whenever he wants it, there is the instant when it’s still not yet two o’clock on that July afternoon in 1863.

[Photo src: P_G_McCullough @ instagram]

Instagram #Bq_Uwbehw6X
instagram
{ posted: Tuesday, 4 December, 2018 at 9:48pm // views: 10 // words: 33 }

Wallpaper’s up and now the tile’s going down. I do pretty shoddy work, but I can’t beat my prices!nnUneven wallpaper line because pvc beadboard sheets will cover lower half.

[Photo src: P_G_McCullough @ instagram]

Instagram #Bq7bVaKBxV7
instagram
{ posted: Monday, 3 December, 2018 at 9:28am // views: 20 // words: 5 }

[Photo src: P_G_McCullough @ instagram]

re: …and I NEED support in a foreign language!
reddit (comment)
{ posted: Wednesday, 28 November, 2018 at 1:59pm // views: 23 // words: 20 }

How do you know if someone's speaking Italian or not when you can't see their hands moving?

[context: PMcCullough @ reddit]

George McCullough in Marion’s Brigade
personal
{ posted: Wednesday, 28 November, 2018 at 10:05am // views: 25 // words: 168 }

A number of places list a George McCullough as having been a captain under Francis Marion in the Revolutionary War. Bobby Gilmer Moss’ invaluable Roster of South Carolina Patriots in the American Revolution describes him as having “served as a captain in the militia under Cols. Marion, Bratton and Graham.”

Moss’ citations start with the pension application of William McCarter, which would appear to be an error, as while a couple of references are made to “Captain McCullough”, at one point, it explicitly states “Captain William McCullough”. Not George.

The second citation is page 410 of Gregg’s History of the Old Cheraws which does indeed list George M’Cullogh as a Captain in Marion’s Brigade in 1782, but gives no other information, nor any source.

The final citation is Year Book, City of Charleston, S.C.: 1893 which I have as yet been unable to find any digitization of to know what it may or may not say, though I suspect it may simply be citing Gregg’s History of the Old Cheraws

re: When you are working on your ‘tree’, how far do you go?
reddit (comment)
{ posted: Monday, 26 November, 2018 at 5:15pm // views: 27 // words: 109 }

I start by working back all of my lines. Either as far as I can go, or until the point of immigration. I have one or two ancestors that came to the US in the early 1800s, but the vast majority in the colonial era, so by the time I follow them back to England or Ireland, they feel too distant to be particularly interesting/meaningful to me.

Then I try to find every possible document I can to flesh out their lives. Then at that point I try and add on siblings, nieces and nephews, etc… but I'm not that far yet with very many lines…

[context: PMcCullough @ reddit]

Instagram #BqfzP2_hzBd
instagram
{ posted: Thursday, 22 November, 2018 at 3:59pm // views: 40 // words: 7 }

Post-glut fireside digesting.

[Photo src: P_G_McCullough @ instagram]

Ninety-Six District Jury List
personal
{ posted: Wednesday, 21 November, 2018 at 1:04pm // views: 21 // words: 2,104 }

As mentioned in previous post, I’m trying to learn more about George McCullough (and distinguish between what may be several of them in the South Carolina colonies) contextually. Will probably try and notate as many of the following men as possible. The list comes from a jury list, specifically those in “The Lower Part of Ninety-Six District in the Fork of Broad and Saluda Rivers”.

Anderson, John
Anderson, George – Captain in The Little River District Regiment of Militia killed in action as per South Carolina Audited Accounts relating to George Anderson SC181
Anderson, Henry – Captain in The Little River District Regiment of Militia killed in action as per South Carolina Audited Accounts relating to Henry Anderson SC182
Anderson, Abel – Private in The First Spartan Regiment of Militia as per South Carolina Audited Accounts relating to Abel Anderson, Jr. SC175
Anderson, Benjamin
Anderson, Abraham – Private in The First Spartan Regiment of Militia as per South Carolina Audited Accounts relating to Abel Anderson, Jr. SC175
Arington, William
Arnold, George
Aspenal, William
Atkins, Benjamin
Atkins, Francis
Atkins, John
Bags, John – Private in The First Spartan Regiment of Militia as per South Carolina Audited Accounts relating to John Baggs SC284
Bansey, Nicholas
Barlow, John
Bartleson, John
Beam, Alexander
Black, Thomas – Loyalist Private as per Loyalists in the Southern Campaign, Volume I.
Black, Peter
Boozard, Roody
Boozard, John
Boozard, Jacob
Brazel, David – Listed (David Brasil) in a 1782 Petition to Lord Germain as a Loyalist murdered by whigs.
Brooks, Jacob
Brooks, Thomas
Brown, John
Buchanan, John
Buchanan, William
Caldwell, Joseph
Campbell, John
Cannon, Ephraim
Cannon, John – Private in The Ninety-Six District Regiment of Militia, The Little River District Regiment of Militia and others as per Pension application of John Cannon S30309
Caridine, Abraham
Carmon, John
Chandler, Joel
Chandler, John – Private in The First Spartan Regiment of Militia then The Ninety-Six District Regiment of Militia as per Pension application John Chandler S10443
Chandlor, Daniel
Chandlor, James
Chandlor, Shadrach – Private in The First Spartan Regiment of Militia as per Pension application of Shadrack Chandler S31606
Chandlor, William
Clarey, Daniel – Loyalist Colonel as per Loyalists in the Southern Campaign, Volume I.
Clark, John
Coale, John
Coats, Charles
Coats, Marmaduke
Coats, John
Coats, John
Colany, Edward
Collins, Adam
Comer, Frederick
Cook, Isaac
Cooke (Enoree), Isaac
Copai, John
Cox, Cornelius
Creyton, Hugh
Cromer, Jacob
Crompton, Samuel
Crooks, Andrew
Crosen, Alexander
Crosen, Thomas
Crossen, James
Cureton, William
Daugherty, Daniel
Daugherty, James
Daugherty, James
Daugherty, James
Davis, Chesley – Listed in a 1782 Petition to Lord Germain as a Loyalist murdered by whigs.
Davis, John – Loyalist Private as per Loyalists in the Southern Campaign, Volume I.
Davis, Nathan
Dawkins, George – Listed in a 1782 Petition to Lord Germain as a Loyalist murdered by whigs.
Dawkins, William
Dawkins, Thomas
Deceskar, Peter
Dennis, Samuel
Dickhart, Michael
Douglas, James
Duncan, John
Dunkin, Samuel – Loyalist Private as per Loyalists in the Southern Campaign, Volume I. (as Samuel Dunken)
Elemon, Enos
Elleman, John
Ellerman, Abner
Elmore, Stephen – served under Capt. William Houseal and Col. Waters after the fall of Charleston. C.S.; A.A.2220; X2505.
Elvin, Michael
Emrey, Moses
Evins, Robert
Felcher, Thomas
Ferguson, David – Listed in a 1782 Petition to Lord Germain as a Loyalist murdered by whigs.
Fish, Joseph
Ford, James
Frederick, Jacob
Frickland, Samuel
Fulker, Peter
Gant, Israel
Gartman, Daniel
Gibson, Thomas – Loyalist Private as per Loyalists in the Southern Campaign, Volume I. – Listed in a 1782 Petition to Lord Germain as a Loyalist murdered by whigs.
Gilbert, John
Gilder, Jacob
Gillum, William
Glen, David – He served as a private, captain, adjutant, commissary, lieutenant-colonel and colonel during 1780, 1781 and 1782 under Cols. Giles, Thomas and Lindsey. During 1781, he served as a captain in the light dragoons under Col. John Thomas, Jr. and Gen. Sumter. He was colonel of the Lower Regiment of the Broad and Saluda Rivers and was in the battle at Cowpens. Salley, Doc., p. 96; A.A.2911; M442; X759; McJunkin Papers.
Godfrey, John
Golle, William
Gollman, John – Listed (John Goldman) in a 1782 Petition to Lord Germain as a Loyalist murdered by whigs.
Gordon, George
Gordon, Thomas
Gorey, John – He served as a horseman under Capt. John Liles from 1 June 1780 to 1 June 1781 and was under Capt. Henry Liles from 1 June to 31 September 1781. In addition, he served under Capt. Edward Kelly from 1 October 1781 to 26 February 1782 and from 8 July to 13 August 1782. All of his service was under Col. Waters. A.A.2992; X1275.
Gorey, Daniel
Gray, George
Gray Junior, George
Green, William
Griffin, Jones
Griffin, Horatio – Loyalist Private as per Loyalists in the Southern Campaign, Volume I.
Griffin, John – Loyalist Private as per Loyalists in the Southern Campaign, Volume I. Listed in a 1782 Petition to Lord Germain as a Loyalist murdered by whigs.
Gulberath, James
Hacheeson, William
Hall, James – Two patriots listed that seem likely, one under Cols. Brandon and Thomas, another under Capt. Lindsay & Col. Waters.
Hall, Matthew
Hamilton, William
Hampton, Joseph
Hampton, Benjamin – under Col. Waters.
Haney, Maximillian
Harris, William
Hawkins, Peter
Hays, Peter
Henry, William
Henson, Dorman
Herbison, William
Herren, William – Light dragoons under Capt. William Smith, Lt. Col. John Thomas, Jr. and Gen. Sumter during 1781. Salley, Doc., p. 99. and/or as William Herring served under Col. Waters.
Hill, Thomas
Hodges, Jacob – Her served twelve months as a private in the Third Regiment and was dead prior to August 1785. V520.
Hossey, Daniel – Loyalist Private as per Loyalists in the Southern Campaign, Volume I. (? loyalist listed as Daniel Horsey – 2 patriot Daniel Horseys, one in Charleston ?)
Hossey Jun., Daniel
Humphrey, David – He served as a horseman in the militia during 1782. A.A.3872; V507.
Inman, Benjamin
Jay, John
Jenkins, David
Johnson, Hugh
Johnson, Alexander
Johnson, John
Johnson, John
Johnson, Daniel – Listed in a 1782 Petition to Lord Germain as a Loyalist murdered by whigs.
Johnson Jrn., John
Jones, John
Jones, Thomas
Jones, Nicholas – Under Col. Waters after the fall of Charleston.
Jones, Robert
Jones, Dacker
Karr, Peter
Keller, John – He served in the militia during 1782 under Gen. Marion. A.A.4197; Y811.
Kelley, Isaac
Kelley, Edward – He enlisted in the Third Regiment on 24 July 1776. He served as a private, lieutenant and captain in the militia under Col. Waters after the fall of Charleston. During 1780, while under Sumter, he lost a horse and gun. He was under Col. Pickens during 1782 and lost a horse. A.A.4199;X2576;N.A.853.
Kelley, Samuel
King, Etheldred
King, Joseph – Loyalist Lieutenant as per Loyalists in the Southern Campaign, Volume I. Two patriots of same name.
King, Charles – He served as a captain under Colonel John Lindsay and went on an expedition against the Cherokee Indians during 1775. (Davis, Clement, W4936); (Chandler, Mesheck, W10616).
Lark, John – He served as a wagon master and also supplied provisions and forage for the militia. A.A. 4440; X1501.
Lasles, Williamson
Lasles, James
Lewis, Thomas
Lightsey, George
Liles, John – He served as a captain and major in the militia under Gens. Williamson and Sumter and was in the battles at Stono, Blackstock’s Plantation and Black Hole. (See John Lisle.) (Grasty, John, R4201); A.A.4583; X1819. / John Lisle: He served as a lieutenant colonel in the militia during 1775. Before resigning during August 1779, he was a lieutenant in the Third Regiment. In 1780, he joined the enemy and then carried his entire unit back to Cols. Neel and Sumter. Heitman, p.353; Salley, O., p. 387; McCrady, II, 619; Yearbook, 1893.
Lindley, Isaac
Lindsay, John – He served as a lieutenant and captain under Cols. Brandon and Waters. (Anderson, Abel, Jr.); (Kincaid, James, R5929); A.A.4595; W550; X1822; X2417. / John LindsEy served as a colonel in the Ninety Six District.
Linsey, Abraham
Linsey, John
Littleton, Charles – Private in The First Spartan Regiment of Militia as per Pension Application of Charles Littleton W8255

Liveret, Robert
Lomanick, Jacob
Lomanuk Sen., Jacob
Mabry, Joel – Militia under Col. Waters after the fall of Charleston.
Martin, George
Mayban, William
McCartey, William
McCole, Gabriel
McConan, JaMes
McConnel, William – Loyalist Private as per Loyalists in the Southern Campaign, Volume I. / He served sixty-three days in the militia under Gen. Marion during 1782.
McCulloch, George – Loyalist Private as per Loyalists in the Southern Campaign, Volume I. / Captain in the militia during 1776 / Captain in the militia under Cols. Marion, Bratton and Graham.
McKeney, George – Loyalist Private as per Loyalists in the Southern Campaign, Volume I. (as George McKinney)
Meslemay, William
Miles, Thomas – militia under Col. Roebuck during 1781.
Mith, Philip
Mitts, Henry – Militia under Col. Waters after the fall of Charleston.
Montgomery, George
Morgan, Isaac – He served as a lieutenant and captain in the militia under Col. Waters during 1779. In addition, he served under Capt. Parson and Col. Roebuck from 7 Jun 1780 to 1 July 1781. A.A.3046; A.A.5343; X1829; X1830.
Morgan, Thomas – Deserted from 3rd Regt 1778. Served under Waters after fall of Charleston.
Mounts, Barnabas
Mounts, George
Murphey, James
Murray, William – Private in Gregg’s History of the Old Cheraws 1782.
Nealy, James – Militia after the fall of Charleston.
Nealy, Samuel – He served in the light horse under Captain Thompson during June, July, November, and December 1780. At sometime, he was a lieutenant. In March 1781, he served as a wagoner and was also a horseman under Capt. Mills during 1781. He was a captain in the militia under Col. Hill during 1781. A.A.5458;M160;Salley, Doc., p. 65.
Nowland, Avry – Aubrey Noland/Auberry Nowland under Col. John Lyles, Capt. George Aubrey, Col. Brandon.
Nox, John
Oats, Peter
Pamer, Isaac
Parmer, John – He served in the militia and was at the fall of Charleston.
Pearson, William
Pearson, Enoch – He served in the militia under Col. Brandon before the fall of Charleston.
Pearson, John – Loyalist Private as per Loyalists in the Southern Campaign, Volume I. Listed in a 1782 Petition to Lord Germain as a Loyalist murdered by whigs.
Pearson, Thomas – Listed in a 1782 Petition to Lord Germain as a Loyalist murdered by whigs.
Pearson, Samuel
Pearson, John – He served as a captain and major in the militia under Gen. Marion during 1779, 1781 and 1782. In addition, he supplied sundries for militia use. Yearbook, 1893; A.A.5795;)163;(Hawthorn, John, S31097).
Pemberton, Isaiah
Pemberton, George
Perry, Thomas
Perry, John
Pettey, James
Pettey, Charles
Purkins, Daniel
Purkins, David – Private in Gregg’s History of the Old Cheraws 1782.
Reeder, William
Richardson, Daniel – He served in the militia under Capt. Gray and Colonel Winn and was wounded. A.A.6380A.
Richardson, Peter
Richardson, William – He first served under a Capt. Gowen (?) and Gen. Lincoln at Black Swamp. Thereafter, he was under a Capt. Anderson. He was at James Island the night before Prevost and Lincoln met at Stono. After the fall of Charleston, he enlisted under Gen. Marion and served under him until the end of the war. He was wounded on the forehead by a bayonet. A.A.6389.
Ridgall, John – (John Ridgill) He served sixty-six days in the militia under Gen. Marion during 1782. A.A.6419; H239; Y1510.
Right, Richard
Riley, John
Riley, ?arina
Riley, Patrick
Risinger, Thomas
Robertson, John
Robinson, Bandol
Rogers, Stephen
Roofe, George – (George Ruff) He served in the militia under Col. Waters after the fall of Charleston.
Ruble, Peter
Ruff, Cudgick – He served in the militia under Col. Waters.
Segler, John – (John Siegler) He served in the militia under Col. Waters after the fall of Charleston.
Sharp, Martin
Shepard, James – He served in the militia under Col. Waters.
Single, Frederick
Smith, Moses – Loyalist Private as per Loyalists in the Southern Campaign, Volume I.
Smith, Joseph – Ranger under Capt. Edward Richardson and Col. Thomson 1775, militia 1780-82 under Capts. Robert Thompson, John Cunningham, Benjamin Garrison. Lieutenant at Four Holes under Col. Winn.
Smith, Thomas – Loyalist Private as per Loyalists in the Southern Campaign, Volume I. / many patriots listed.
Smith, Daniel – 3 Patriot listings, most likely lieutenant under Col. Bratton during 1781.
Spark, John
Steel, John – Several possible patriots.
Steel, Samuel
Stewart, William – 3rd Regt under Capt. Felix Warley, militia 1782.
Stewart, Joshua
Stewart, Alexander – Loyalist Private as per Loyalists in the Southern Campaign, Volume I. / 2 patriots listed.
Stickman, John
Stockman, English
Stokman, Engle
Suber, George
Tarburt, John
Taylor, William
Thomas, Nehemiah
Thomas, John
Thompson, Abraham
Thompson, Charles – He served in the light dragoons under Capt. Philemon Waters, Lt. Col. John Thomas, Jr. and Gen. Sumter during 1781. At sometime, he was in the militia under Colonel Brandon. Salley, Doc., p. 101; A.A.7743;M505;X3244.
Thompson, Joseph
Turner, John – Loyalist Private as per Loyalists in the Southern Campaign, Volume I.
Tygert, William
Vanhorn, Benjamin
Vanjant, Jacob
Vessels, Shadrach – He served in the militia under Col. Waters before and after the fall of Charleston.
Volentine, John – (John Valentine) He served in the militia after the fall of Charleston.
Wadell, John
Wadleton, William – (William Wadlington?) He served as a captain in the militia under Col. Waters.
Wadleton, Edward
Wafer, Francis – served under William Wadlington. Militia under Capt. T. Jones. 42 days under Capt. James Kelly and Col. Waters.
Wakard, William
Waker, Henry
Waker, Matthias
Walker, William
Waters, Philemon – Colonel mentioned repeatedly above.
Wilkinson, John
Williams, Jeremiah – Sgt under Capt William Waddington (Wadleton/Wadlington above) and Col. Liles. They joined Gen. Williamson under Col. Rutherford. Went to Virginia after fall of Charleston. Came home to find family plundered. Joined Green at siege of Ninety Six. Ordered by Pickens to enlist mounted riflemen under Col. Hammond. At sometime under Col. Waters. Mentioned in Abel Anderson pension)
Wilson, James – Listed in a 1782 Petition to Lord Germain as a Loyalist murdered by whigs.
Wilson, Charles
Wiseman, Hugh
Wiseman, Robert
Wood, Thomas – Several possible. One under Eli Kershaw and Col. Thomson, then under Capt. George Lidell.
Wright, John – Several possible. One under Eli Kershaw and Col. Thomson.
Wright, William – Militia 1782.

Early George McCullough in Orangeburg County, SC
personal
{ posted: Wednesday, 21 November, 2018 at 12:37pm // views: 19 // words: 285 }

Having largely exhausted source information in the hunt for my ancestor George McCullough, I’ve been digging into contextual links. Neighbors, veterans of the same regiments, etc…

The biggest problem right now is distinguishing between George McCulloughs in Colonial South Carolina.

1) There is one, pretty clearly my forebear, who arrived from Ireland on November 7th, 1772, and subsequently received a Plat, Land Grant, then Memorial for land described variously as being in “Craven County”, “Between Broad And Saludy Rivers”, and in some proximity to “Bigg Creek”, and “Fishdam Creek”.
2) Another, the first apparent immigrant, who arrived from Ireland February 27th, 1767 and received Plat, Land Grant, then Memorial for land described variously as being in “Boonesborough Township”, “Granville County”, and on “Hogskin Creek” (perhaps 54 miles west of my George McCullough).
3) A George McCullough who is not recorded as an immigrant in the immigration records I found the preceding two in, but who received (in 1770) a Plat, Land Grant, then Memorial for land described variously as being in “Craven County”, and in proximity to “Scape Ore Swamp” and “Black River”. However, the Plat has the word “Bounty” on it, which seems to indicate immigration…

At any rate, up until today, these represented the earliest George McCulloughs I’ve encountered reference to in South Carolina. But today, I happened upon The History of Orangeburg County, South Carolina, from Its First Settlement to the Close of the Revolutionary War which, on page 177, records the birth of Jacob to Garret & Agnesia FitzPatrick on February 9th, 1758. The infant’s “Sureties” (read: godparents) are John McColloch, George McColloch & Lydia McColloch.

Not quite sure how (if at all) this might fit into the picture. Largely just saving this for future reference.

re: Protestant Irish Land Grants in Colonial South Carolina
reddit (comment)
{ posted: Tuesday, 20 November, 2018 at 9:32am // views: 28 // words: 21 }

Cool! Would be happy to offer my own "expertise" such as it is if you need any help.

[context: PMcCullough @ reddit]

re: Gold to the first person who can find any information about the parents of Thomas T Woodworth!
reddit (comment)
{ posted: Monday, 19 November, 2018 at 2:59pm // views: 37 // words: 117 }

I pulled all of the Woodworth men in Suffield, CT born between 1851-1874 (seemed like a reasonable age range to sire a son in 1895) and wound up with 9 men. Most, in 1900, are easily accounted for with kids that don't include Thomas. I can't find Albert Woodworth, born 1862, in the 1900 census. So he might be worth digging into, but the one that I found more intriguing was William L, born 1874, who is in the 1910 census working at the Brooklyn Naval Yards, not far from where Thomas wound up in the 1930 census… He's listed as single, but maybe that wasn't correct? Or he was widowed or divorced?

[context: PMcCullough @ reddit]

Protestant Irish Land Grants in Colonial South Carolina
reddit
{ posted: Monday, 19 November, 2018 at 1:57pm // views: 30 // words: 170 }

Hey all–wondering if anyone has any experience with Protestant Land Grants in Colonial South Carolina? My ancestor George McCullough arrived in Charleston on November 7th, 1772. On January 6th, 1773, he received a "Plat" for 100 acres (evidently every individual received 100 acres, plus 50 for each additional member of the household, so George was evidently traveling solo). On March 17th, 1775, he received a "Land Grant" for that 100 acres. Then, on August 10th, 1775, he received a "Memorial" for TWO tracts, "Both For 100 Acres Each".

I'm assuming that the process was something along the lines of

1) Plat–they surveyed the land that he was to receive.

2) Land Grant–he was given possession of said land.

3) Memorial–having proven that he had settled said land, it became his in full.

Can anyone confirm that this would have been the process? And further, can anyone hazard a guess as to why he was evidently given an extra one hundred acres when all was said and done?

[src: PMcCullough @ reddit]

The Rebel/Yankee playset I got my 6yo comes with a US Flag and a "red flag".
reddit
{ posted: Friday, 16 November, 2018 at 2:52pm // views: 38 // words: 4 }

[src: PMcCullough @ reddit]

Instagram #BqN7lPHhbsK
instagram
{ posted: Thursday, 15 November, 2018 at 5:25pm // views: 29 // words: 5 }

Idiotic.

[Photo src: P_G_McCullough @ instagram]

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